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Andy Sullivan with Rory McIlroy
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Sullivan hoping to take darts form onto golf course

European rookie Andy Sullivan will hope his aim on the golf course is as good as it is in the team room after proclaiming himself to be king of the dart board.

The 30 year old Englishman, an automatic qualifier for Darren Clarke's side, is one of six first-timers in the European Ryder Cup team.

There is a long lead up to Friday's opening foursomes and when practice and daily meetings are finished there are a number of options available to the players to help fill the time, back in the European team’s fantastic team room at their hotel.

Table tennis is always a firm favourite with the American team but it is the dart board that gets a lot of attention from some of the Europeans.

"I think the best part of the team room is the darts board," said Sullivan. "That’s where you’ll find me taking down a few of the boys I reckon. I think Poults' (vice captain Ian Poulter) and his caddie Terry (Mundy) are pretty good, so they will be a tough test. But at the moment, I'm top dog. I'm quite happy with that."

As a rookie Sullivan has been understandably keen to take on as much information about the event as possible, from a variety of sources within the European locker room.

“I spoke to Rory a little bit and I spoke to a few of the vice captains and obviously Darren (Clarke), as well, about it quite a lot,” he said.

“Rory was saying to remember to breath and stuff like that, while Darren said in America it's obviously going to be a certain type of atmosphere and quite one-sided. So I know what to expect there.

“It's okay someone telling you what to expect, but obviously you'll take your own experiences out of it and realize what it's all about when you're there in the moment.”

The three time European Tour winner has become known for his laid-back, friendly nature, and he used those character traits to answer a question from the floor about Tiger Woods, one of the USA’s vice captains, potentially being used as an intimidating presence on the first tee.

“I’m happy when anyone comes to watch me, but if Tiger comes and stands next to me and watches me play golf, I don't think I'd get nervous. I'd want to impress him almost and just go out there and do my thing. I’d give him a little smile and a handshake, and congratulate him on what he's done for golf.”